Thursday, May 23, 2013

Energy-Saving Indoor and Outdoor Lighting Choices

It’s amazing how much it costs to light a home inside and out.  And there is a bigger cost than just the money you’re spending on electricity and bulbs. There is also an environmental cost to producing all of that electricity.  Let’s take a look at seven energy-saving indoor and outdoor lighting tips.

An electric residential lighting dimmer switch...
An electric residential lighting dimmer switch. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
#1.  One of the easiest ways to conserve energy is to invest in a dimmer.  If you don’t need all 100 watts blasting, then a dimmer can reduce the amount of energy pulled from a light fixture.  Great places to put a dimmer are in bathrooms, kitchens and dining rooms and even in your living room if you use overhead lighting.

#2.  100 watts isn’t always best.  Choose your lighting by the room.  Some rooms need lots of bright lighting, say over your vanity for example; you want to be able to see your face clearly before you put on make-up or shave.  However, you probably don’t need high voltage fixtures in your closet.

#3.  Compact fluorescent bulbs.  CFL bulbs cost a bit more per bulb; however, they last ten times longer than the average incandescent and they use less energy.  A single CFL bulb can save over $30 in electricity costs over the life of the bulb and it saves 2,000 times its own weight in carbon emissions.

#4.  Motion sensors.  These are great for outdoor lighting because they turn on only when there is movement.  They’re perfect for porch lights, over the garage and even on your back patio or walkway. 

A CFL light bulb, on a wall, in a black lanter...
A CFL light bulb. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
#5.  Solar lighting.  Solar lighting is another great option for both indoor and outdoor lighting.  Solar panels can be used to provide energy to internal lighting.  And outdoors, solar lights can be used to light walkways, porches, pools, fountains and other outdoor features.

#6.  Passive solar is a no-cost lighting solution.  Passive solar means letting the sun light your home.  Whether it’s through strategically placed windows, skylights or solar tubes, the sun can do a tremendous job of lighting your home for free.

#7.  Use timers on vacation.  Finally, timers are a great way to have lights turn on and off when you’re away.  Many people, when they go on vacation, leave the lights on.  Instead of wasting all that money and energy, put lights on a timer. 

Just incorporating a few of these energy-saving indoor and outdoor lighting tips can cut your energy bill in half each year.  Enjoy the savings and your contribution to a greener planet.


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1 comment:

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